Transcriptions | Peter von Danzig

Peter von Danzig

Latest publication

In October 2008 my book with the complete transcription and translation into modern German of the manuscript 44 A 8 (commonly attributed to Peter von Danzig) will be published in print. It is based on this Hammaborg online version.
When I prepared the data for the printed edition, I thoroughly checked every minute detail. And indeed I found about half a dozen minor mistakes in the transcription, numerous comma faults or cases of bad syntax in the translation. I also revised a couple of passages and made a completely new translation.
Of course, I was able to add a considerable amount of typographic refinement—particularly regarding the abundance of special characters. Thus, the transcription matches the original manuscript with all its abbreviations and diacitical marks as closely as possible.
The online version (which I can adapt only later on) is not necessarily obsolete but it is definitely not as aaccurate as the print version.
Further information about the book in the publications or the literature section.

Dierk Hagedorn, September 2008

Annotations

These are the transcription and the translation into Modern German of an Early High German manuscript from 1452 that is commonly attributed to Peter von Danzig. The original with the reference number Cod. 44 A 8 [Cod. 1449] rests in the Biblioteca dell’Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei e Corsiniana, Rome.

The transcription

The transcription tries to follow the original as closely as possible. I have not dissolved the letter "v" in either "u" or "v". Abbreviations, duplication characters or other special characters remain mostly intact - considering the restraints of internet typography.

The manuscript contains a number of ligatures which are not common any more in modern type-setting. I have dissolved these ligatures into their corresponding single characters. Every now and then there is a certain ligature that could be read either as "tz" or as "cz". Sometimes it is only the tiniest of a vertical line over the letter "z" that allows an accurate identification. In this transcription, I have used "tz" uniformly. Additionally, the manuscript shows a variety of the letter "s". I have dissolved the corresponding ligatures, even the connection between the long and the round "s" at the end of a word. However, there remains the ligature "sz" which I have transcribed as "ß".

Capitalization according to modern standards (particularly in the German language) is rather vague, to say the least. Occasionally, a single word is capitalized for emphasis in mid-sentence, frequently it's the word "Indes" which usually is not capitalized. In many cases it is very hard to make out the difference between small and capital letter so one could only guess sometimes. Additionally, the first line on a page sometimes shows more capital letters than the rest of the text block.

Structural or mental units are marked by a small red vertical line that runs right through the first character of such a unit. I have put a corresponding line in front of the letter.

The translation

To enable a side-by-side comparison, I have put the translated sections opposite to the transcribed parts. I have endeavoured to transform the Early High German manuscript into a modern language that is easy to understand without being too unjust to the original. However, I have split up the almost endless sentences into shorter ones for a better digestion, and I have made use of interpunction, something not existent in the original.

Furthermore, I abandoned the frequent request "merck" and the occasional enumerating word "item". The text lacks no clarity but is a little easier to access. Also missing is the word "glosa" which marks the beginning of almost every commentary on Liechtenauer's teachings.

I have straightened some of the more tenacious redundancies in main and subordinate clauses and used multiple subjects or objects only once. I have also shortened many of the lengthier headlines.

It was particularly problematic to translate the passages that represent Liechtenauer's teachings, the so-called "Merkverse" (written in red). These are cryptic and obscure by their nature and have to be inspected and examined again since they were a little reluctant to being translated accurately.

The pagination follows the manuscript as closely as possible. There are minor deviations only when a sentence starts on one page and ends on the other.

Concerning the names of techniques, principles and certain courses of motion that are mentioned in the text, they have benefitted from a modern orthography. However, there are slight inconsistencies. The term "haw" should be a "Hieb" in Modern German. So whenever there is a "haw" mentioned in the manuscript, I have translated "Hieb". The names of particular "hawe" however retain their independence. So there are "Zornhau", "Twerhau", or "Oberhau" in the translation instead of "Zornhieb", "Querhieb", or "Oberhieb".

Whenever I found something in my translation particularly risky, I have put it in square brackets. Unclear passages are marked with a question mark in brackets.

Dierk Hagedorn, June 2006

Johannes Liechtenauer
Introduction

Johannes Liechtenauer
Longsword

Johannes Liechtenauer
Fighting on Horseback

Johannes Liechtenauer
Harnessfighting

Andre Lignitzer
Halfsword

Andre Lignitzer
Buckler

Andre Lignitzer
Wrestling

Andre Lignitzer
Dagger

Martin Huntfelt
Halfsword

Martin Huntfelt
Holding Down and Getting Up

Martin Huntfelt
Dagger

Martin Huntfelt
Fighting on Horseback

Meister Ott
Wrestling

Peter von Danzig
Harnessfighting